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Case study of Sivananda Electronics
The design of the Series 40 is ideally suited for housing of various functional modules and sub-assemblies. Such unit assemblies can first be tested separately before being integrated into the final assembly. This cuts down the overall production and testing time. Also, the time from the drawing board to start of manufacture can be reduced significantly with this approach-bringing down the costs of the project itself.

The Company
Sivananda Electronics is well known to air travellers as a provider of Security and Access Control Systems. Sivananda also manufactures Test and Measuring Equipment, industrial metal detectors, electronic motor winding testers, and customized automated testing systems. Over the last 30 years Sivananda has introduced more than 300 innovative products to cater to different application sectors - such as Defence, Power, Communications and Railways.

APW President has been associated with Sivananda for the last 7 years in their development of new products. Our application expertise, which has been accumulated over the past 20 years in solving hundreds of real-life problems faced by our customers, works for the benefit of customers like Sivananda.

The Problem
Sivananda was developing a new instrument – a C and TanD Bridge – for measuring the electrical properties of insulating systems. These electrical properties change due to age and continuous electrical stress. The instrument under development measures these properties – and hence the operational reliability - thus providing a means for avoiding costly break - downs.

Through interactions with Sivananda’s R&D team during the development phase it became clear that the C and TanD Bridge required a table – top case rugged enough to hold 15kgs of electronic hardware, while still fulfilling other requirements such as good aesthetics, ease of usage and maintainability. The enclosure would need to house 4 PCB assemblies, 2 transformers weighing 3kgs each, 2 potentiometers, 6 switches and 20 capacitors.

The Solution
To arrive at a proper solution the entire set of components and sub-assemblies to be accommodated in the instrument case were first gathered together in a mock layout. This established the total weight to be 15kgs. Measuring of the various components helped to determine physical dimensions. The tallest component was a transformer of 135mm height – which set the height. The size of the other units established the width and depth dimensions. It was thus worked out that the enclosure would need an internal usable space of 160mm height, 300mm width and 290mm depth.
Front Panel of the C and TanD Bridge

Since the application specifically demanded a table-top enclosure, it narrowed the choices to either the Series 40 or Series 42 instrument cases. These are both versatile aluminium cases made from extruded interlocking profiles, with aluminium panels and covers. While the Series 42 offers better price economy, the Series 40 has more features built into it which makes it easier for instrument makers to house their components and sub-assemblies in it, install wire harnesses and do the interconnections.

Sivananda therefore opted for a Series 40 instrument case of 4U height (177mm overall), 63T width (343.6mm overall) and 305mm depth. In addition to the basic configuration, Pull-Out Handles were included so as to help in portability. Also, customized Front and Rear Panels were provided. These are used for mounting an analog meter, switches, potentiometers, power sockets, and various other components. Special care was taken to avoid the need to brush these panels after the fabrication processes are completed. This was an important consideration as the Panels are screen-printed with the textual matter after anodizing. The get-up of the Front Panel largely determines the overall look of the instrument. Since brushing creates a fine grain on the surface, it can lead to a slight spreading of the ink – as a result of which the screen printing can appear fuzzy, instead of being clean and crisp. Thus special care was taken to ensure that Sivananda’s Front and Rear panels would have uncompromised good looks.

The Benefits
The solution proposed by APW President was adopted by Sivananda. The resulting C and TanD Bridge is a functionally effective product-and use of the S-40 case has provided several other benefits as well.

  • Ease of usage. The S-40 has several built-in provisions which make it easy to partition the internal space in any of the 3 axes – vertically, depthwise or widthwise. This makes it simple to fix chassis plates, trays, brackets and other mechanical parts for mounting of transformers, components and sub-assemblies, and other functional units such as power supplies.

  • Modularity. The design of the S-40 is ideally suited for housing of various functional modules and sub-assemblies. Such unit assemblies can first be tested separately before being integrated into the final assembly. This cuts down the overall production and testing time. Also, the time from the drawing board to start of manufacture can be reduced significantly with this approach-bringing down the costs of the project itself.

  • Maintainability. The easily removable covers and the slim internal frame of the S-40 allow quick and easy access to any component or assembly inside the S-40. A look at the accompanying photograph shows the clean and uncluttered internal layout of Sivananda’s unit. All assemblies, including the Front and Rear Panel sub-assemblies, can be accessed easily for trouble-shooting and repairs, and can also be replaced in the field with little effort.

  • View of Front Panel assembly showing
    internal layout of the Bridge




    View showing the clean functional layout

    Conclusion
    On looking at the photograph of the C and TanD Bridge, with its clean and elegant looking front panel, it will not be an overstatement to say that the S-40 has added value to Sivananda’s product.
    Products Used

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